GPL Blog

Spooky Season Selections

Halloween is almost here, m’dears! I recently had the chance to do some traveling and get caught up on four horror/Gothic/spooky adjacent books from my TBR (To Be Read) list/mountain, and I want to share the bounty with you. We’ve got YA, we’ve got adult, we’ve got vampires, tree creatures, parasites, and more! So grab a cup of your favorite hot beverage and a blanket and settle in for some spooky reads. Vampires of El Norte by Isabel Cañas From the publisher: Vampires and vaqueros face off on the Texas-Mexico border in this supernatural western from the author of The Hacienda.  I loved The Hacienda. I reviewed it for this blog back in 2021. And once again, Isabel is teaching me Mexican history via horror novels. This time the setting is 1840s Mexico near the Texas border. While The Hacienda was full of Gothic elements, VoEN is much more character Read more »

Book Review | Walk Through Fire by Yasmine S. Ali

From the publisher: The first book to examine the rarely-acknowledged Waverly Train Disaster of 1978 – the catastrophic accident that changed America forever and led to the formation of FEMA.

Since Galesburg is a railroad town and I can hear the trains go by my house – most of us in Galesburg can – I was interested in Walk Through Fire. I was in high school when the Waverly Train Disaster happened, and even though my parents are both from Tennessee, I don’t remember hearing anything about it.

Ali was a child in Waverly when the disaster happened. Her parents are physicians who emigrated from the Middle East to Waverly and played critical roles in the one bright spot during the disaster – the triage work that took place in the small local hospital after the explosion. Ali is justifiably proud of them and interested in the disaster, and her personal interest is reflected in the book.

Ali covers a lot of ground. Some of the information did not add much to the story for me as a reader. For example, there is a long part about Union Forces in Tennessee during the Civil War and the laying of tracks by Black laborers, and the information about what caused the disaster was very detailed. But Ali really cares about the town and its people, she knows many of the survivors, and her empathy for the people of Waverly really shines through. I can tell she did a lot of research and conducted a lot of interviews. She describes the terrible burns that people suffered with compassion and her own medical knowledge as a doctor.

I actually feel better about the unknown cargo on trains coming through Galesburg each night after reading this book. A lot of mistakes were made that led to the Waverly explosion, by the railroad and by local law enforcement because they had no idea how dangerous the situation is. A full investigation led to a number of changes to regulations and standards and to the creation of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

I listened to the author read much of the book. She’s not a professional reader, and some of her phrasing was a little odd. However, her own passion for the subject kept me going.

If you live near trains or are interested in how disasters shaped our lives for the better by prompting safety changes, you might want to read Walk Through Fire.

The Galesburg Public Library owns Walk Through Fire in print and as a Playaway audiobook.

Cooking the Books | Bouchon Bakery by Thomas Keller

I was looking for a pumpkin scone recipe, and while I didn’t find one of those, I did find Bouchon Bakery. It’s a pretty big book filled with all sorts of bread, muffins, and other carb-filled confections. As with most modern cookbooks, personal anecdotes, pieces of advice, and beautiful photos are interspersed between recipes. The personal anecdotes don’t mean much to me, since I have no idea who these folks are, but I did find a lot of good advice I had never heard before. Who knew you were supposed to lightly beat and strain eggs before mixing them to batter? Without the photos this would definitely feel overwhelming. Even with the photos, this cookbook could keep you busy for a very long time– reading it and baking from it. The authors are in favor of sacrificing convenience for the freshest ingredients and most authentic flavors. This means you better be prepared, as some doughs need to rest before they are baked. You also might need to look in specialty shops for things like fresh vanilla beans or whole nutmegs.

Some advice they gave, however, felt unrealistic or unfeasible for a hobby baker. I personally don’t plan on ordering pre-cut rectangles of parchment paper from restaurant specialty shops or acquiring a bicycle pastry cutter, and I definitely don’t have all (or even most) of the pastry bag tips they suggest. Unfortunately, the too-small font combined with the sheen of the pages and the unwieldy size of the book make this book difficult to read for very long.

Since I didn’t find my pumpkin scone recipe, I went with the next closest thing: pumpkin muffins. I opted to not decorate, frost, or fill mine (sorry, coworkers).

I did make a few changes to this recipe to make it work in my kitchen:

  • I didn’t have a stand mixer with a whisk attachment, so I whisked the batter by hand.

  • I used ground nutmeg instead of fresh grated nutmeg.

  • I used unsweetened applesauce in one batch (instead of eggs) for a vegan friendly version.

  • I also didn’t have a kitchen scale, so I used the cup/spoon measurements provided.

Since I had the home team advantage, I tried one of each (traditional and eggless) as soon as they were cool enough to eat. I could tell that they were dry but had the bready fall flavor I was looking for. Aside from that, I couldn’t tell the difference between the two once they were baked. In dough form, it was visibly obvious that the applesauce batter was more moist. The consensus from my coworkers was that the muffins were dry but had a lot of flavor–the clove flavor especially stood out. Some of their comments include:

  • Good, but not as moist as I would like.

  • Delightfully crusty on top, and crumbly inside. Appreciate that they aren’t greasy like so many muffins.

  • A little dry, very dense, I like the cloves.

  • Good spice flavor, but very dense and somewhat dry. Afterburn with the clove, which is nice.

  • Very tasty, but they are a tad dry. The no-egg version [muffins] are much more moist! Very good!!

A couple of people suggested adding things like chocolate chips or walnuts. Overall, I thought these were pretty tasty and definitely worth the effort.

Recipe

Ingredients

All-purpose flour 200 grams | 1 ¼ cups + 3 tablespoons
Baking soda 2.3 grams | ½ teaspoon
Ground cinnamon 2.2 grams | ¾ + ⅛ teaspoon
Ground cloves 0.6 gram | ¼ teaspoon
Freshly grated nutmeg 0.5 gram | ½ teaspoon
Ground allspice 0.1 gram | pinch
Kosher salt 1 gram | ½ teaspoon
Granulated sugar 222 grams | 1 cup + 2 teaspoons
Canola oil 100 grams | ¼ cup + 3 tablespoons
Pure canned pumpkin puree or fresh pumpkin puree 210 grams| ¾ cup + 2 tablespoons
Eggs 100 grams | ¼ cup + 2 ½ tablespoons
Golden raisins (optional) 80 grams | ½ cup + ½ tablespoon
Cream cheese frosting 286 grams | 1 ¼ cups

You’ll need a 6-cup jumbo muffin pan, muffin papers, a disposable pastry bag, a pastry bag with an Ateco #865 French star tip (optional), and a 1 ⅜ inch round cutter (optional)

Instructions

TO BAKE THE MUFFINS: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (standard). Line the muffin pan with muffin papers and spray the papers with nonstick spray.

Transfer the batter to the disposable pastry bag and cut ½ inch of the tip from the bag; or use a large spoon. Pipe or spoon the batter into the papers, stopping ½ inch from the top (140 grams each).

Place the pan in the oven, lower the oven temperature to 325 degrees F, and bake for 45 to 48 minutes, or until the muffins are golden brown and a skewer inserted in the center comes out clean. Set the pan on a cooling rack and cool completely.

TO FILL THE MUFFINS: Using the round cutter, cut through the top of each muffin, stopping ½ inch from the bottom, and carefully remove the center (or use a paring knife to remove the centers).

Transfer the frosting to the pastry bag with the star tip and fill the cavity of each muffin with 35 grams/2 ½ tablespoons of the frosting. Then pipe a rosette in the center of each muffin. Refrigerate uncovered for about 30 minutes to firm.

The muffins are best the day they are completed, but they can be refrigerated in a covered container for up to 3 days. Unfilled muffins can be wrapped individually in a few layers of plastic wrap or stored in a single layer in a covered container at room temperature for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 week.  Makes 6 muffins.

Book Review | The Christmas Guest by Peter Swanson

From the publisher: A spectacularly spine-chilling novella in which an American art student in London is invited to join a classmate for the holidays at Starvewood Hall, her family’s Cotswold manor house. But behind the holly and pine boughs, secrets are about to unravel, revealing this seemingly charming English village’s grim history.

The Christmas Guest is a small bite of a read, a little snack that can be read in one sitting. It’s immersive and fun and a bit disturbing. We hear from two voices: Emma Chapman, the English student who lives at Starvewood Hall, and Ashley Smith, the American classmate Emma has invited home for the holidays. Ashley speaks to us through the words she pours into her diary.

The author pulled me in right from the Dedication: “For two aunts – Pearl Taylor Moynihan, who disliked Christmas, and Sue Ellis Swasey, who doesn’t particularly like it either.” The dedication is followed by an Epigraph that calls out to A Christmas Carol.

The novella opens with our narrator, living in New York and alone on Christmas Day except for her cat, sorting through her crowded bedroom closet. She comes across an old diary, written by a friend thirty years ago. Although hesitant to “go back in time to that annus horribilis, that murderous year,” she cannot stop herself and begins to read.

The author pokes fun at himself and his “gothic” novella, with Ashley, the diary’s author, revealing that things are both exciting and creepy and almost willing herself into a gothic romance or thriller. (“Chance of gothic thriller murder mystery: Growing by the minute.”) There are a few twists, but in a weird way, this is a comfort read for the cozy mystery reader. It doesn’t take much imagination to figure out where the story is going, but the atmosphere makes it worth the read.

The cover is amazing – cute and cozy but also sinister. I read an advance reader copy of The Christmas Guest from Netgalley.

It is scheduled to be released on October 17 and will be available at the Galesburg Public Library. (Although it comes out in October, I recommend waiting until Christmastime to read it. 😊)

New Adult Nonfiction — October 2023

As the autumn leaves turn, October 2023 heralds a fresh wave of adult nonfiction books that promise to ignite curiosity and broaden horizons. From illuminating science and history to compelling personal narratives, these upcoming releases cater to diverse intellectual tastes. Join us in this blog post as we dive into a curated selection of new nonfiction titles, perfect for readers seeking knowledge, inspiration, and a meaningful October reading journey.


Why We Love Baseball: A History in 50 Moments by Joe Posnanski

In Why We Love Baseball by Joe Posnanski, readers are treated to a captivating journey through 50 iconic moments in the history of America’s beloved pastime. Posnanski’s storytelling prowess and unique perspectives, from fans to players, bring these moments to life, whether it’s Willie Mays’s legendary catch or Kirk Gibson’s limping home run. Building on his prior work, The Baseball 100, Posnanski explores the heart of the game, spanning from historic duels to breaking racial barriers, offering fresh insights into our enduring love for baseball. This book serves as an affectionate tribute to a sport that continuously inspires, thrills, and leaves us yearning for more.


While You Were Out: An Intimate Family Portrait of Mental Illness in an Era of Silence by Meg Kissinger

In While You Were Out by Meg Kissinger, the façade of a charmed 1960s suburban Chicago family with eight children and loving parents conceals a darker reality. Behind closed doors, their mother grapples with anxiety and depression, their father exhibits manic tendencies, and their children face bipolar disorder and depression, resulting in tragic outcomes. Meg Kissinger’s personal family story evolves into a journalistic career, shedding light on the flaws within America’s mental health care system. This powerful blend of memoir and investigative reporting exposes the consequences of silence, flawed policies, and the potential for healing through innovative treatments.


The Milkweed Lands by Eric Lee-Mäder

The Milkweed Lands offers a captivating exploration of the often-overlooked milkweed plant and its intricate ecosystem. Ecologist Eric Lee-Mäder and botanical artist Beverly Duncan provide engaging text and stunning illustrations to trace every stage of milkweed’s lifecycle and its vital role in supporting a variety of creatures, from monarch butterflies to bumblebees. The book also delves into different milkweed species, garden propagation, industrial uses, and more, making it a comprehensive and delightful journey into the world of this remarkable plant.


The Horrors of the House of Wills by Daryl Marston

In The Horrors of the House of Wills: A True Story of a Paranormal Investigator’s Most Terrifying Case, readers are drawn into the heart-pounding world of Daryl Marston, co-lead on A&E’s Ghost Hunters, as he recounts a spine-chilling journey that pushed the boundaries of his paranormal expertise. Within the malevolent confines of the House of Wills, a former funeral home in Cleveland, Ohio, Marston confronts an insidious evil that has simmered for years, culminating in a nightmarish paranormal maelstrom. Marston’s gripping firsthand account unravels the thirteen-hour investigation, marked by lost time, phantom footsteps, and relentless dark spirits attempting to breach his psyche. This true story unfolds as a haunting exploration of the unexplained and leaves an indelible mark on both Marston and readers alike, showcasing the depths of terror that can be found within the House of Wills.


Talking to Spirits by Sterling Moon

In Talking to Spirits by Sterling Moon, readers are guided through the art of spirit communication. Moon, drawing on extensive experience, provides step-by-step instructions and engaging stories to help readers develop their own practice. The book covers diverse spirit types, from ancestors to elementals, and includes practical techniques and journal prompts. Moon also offers guidance on managing haunted situations and explores various communication tools. With a strong focus on ethics and protection, this comprehensive guide is suitable for both beginners and experienced practitioners.

Book Review | The Road to Roswell by Connie Willis

From the publisher: A delightful novel about alien invasions, conspiracies, and the incredibly silly things people are willing to believe—some of which may actually be true. Part alien-abduction adventure, part road trip saga, part romantic comedy, The Road to Roswell is packed full of Men in Black, Elvis impersonators, tourist traps, rattlesnakes, chemtrails, and Close Encounters of the Third, Fourth, and Fifth kind.

The Road to Roswell is a screwball science fiction romantic comedy. A woman travels to Roswell to be her best friend’s Maid of Honor and is kidnapped by a tumbleweed alien while she is wearing a neon green, glow-in-the-dark bridesmaid outfit. The tumbleweed takes her on the run, then kidnaps a con man, a true believer of alien conspiracies, a professional gambler, and the driver of a large mobile home.

There’s nothing particularly original here, but the story is a lot of fun (if a little long). The author works in a lot of pop culture references that add to the story, and I enjoyed the southwestern setting. This book would probably be especially fun to listen to on a long road trip.

This is science fiction that doesn’t take itself – or humanity – very seriously. There is a lot of sly, subtle humor, and even the unlikable characters are likable. The many references to western movie tropes were especially fun, and there are a lot of nods to “kidnapped by an alien” tropes as well. There are some plot twists – not very well hidden plot twists – and commentary on the gullibility of humans who Want to Believe in whatever conspiracy theory they’ve latched on to. I found the ending a bit flat.

The Road to Roswell reminded me of the author’s book Crosstalk but also Men in Black, Little Miss Sunshine, the funny episodes of the X-Files, and Project Hail Mary.

The Galesburg Public Library owns The Road to Roswell and other books by author Connie Willis in multiple formats.

New Adult Fiction Releases — October 2023

As the leaves don their fiery autumn attire and the air takes on a crisp, inviting chill, we bibliophiles know that it’s time to cozy up with a book that promises to whisk us away to distant realms, provoke thought, and maybe even raise an eyebrow or two. Enter October 2023, with a dazzling array of literary delights for the discerning reader. From pulse-pounding thrillers to introspective tales of love and self-discovery, this month’s book releases are poised to cater to a variety of tastes. Prepare to be drawn into the world of these upcoming adult fiction releases, whether you have a penchant for well-established authors or an insatiable appetite for fresh voices in the literary scene.

So, grab your cherished blanket, brew that steaming cup of tea or coffee, and join us on a journey through the pages of these remarkable stories that are sure to make your October nights all the more enchanting. Welcome to the realm of October 2023’s literary treasures; you’re in for a treat!


The Leftover Woman by Jean Kwok

The Leftover Woman is a gripping novel that weaves together the lives of two remarkable women in the bustling backdrop of New York City. Jasmine Yang, a determined Chinese immigrant, seeks her lost daughter while escaping her oppressive past, while Rebecca Whitney, a seemingly privileged publishing executive, faces the unraveling of her picture-perfect life. As their paths intersect, this suspenseful and emotionally charged story delves into themes of identity, motherhood, and the unbreakable bonds that transcend cultural and economic divides in a city of contrasts.


Let Us Descend by Jesmyn Ward

In Let Us Descend by Jesmyn Ward, readers are taken on an emotional journey through the harrowing world of American Slavery, guided by the resilient Annis. From the Carolina rice fields to the New Orleans slave markets, and the brutal Louisiana sugar plantation, Ward’s storytelling paints a vivid portrait of a dark and painful history. Annis’s story, shaped by her memories of her mother and the tales of her African warrior grandmother, is a testament to the enduring strength of heritage and the human spirit. Ward’s narrative blends history with elements of the supernatural, offering a profound exploration of resilience and hope amidst unimaginable adversity.


My Darling Girl by Jennifer McMahon

In Jennifer McMahon’s spine-tingling psychological thriller, a woman named Alison, initially resistant to the approaching holiday season, is compelled to confront her traumatic past when her estranged, terminally ill mother, Mavis, seeks reconciliation. Despite her reservations stemming from a history of alcoholism and abuse, Alison reluctantly agrees to welcome Mavis into her Vermont home, hoping for a chance at healing and a better relationship. However, as mysterious and paranormal events unfold upon Mavis’s arrival, Alison becomes increasingly suspicious of her mother’s true nature. The holiday festivities take a nightmarish turn, forcing Alison to grapple with the unsettling possibility that something malevolent is targeting her family, leading to gut-wrenching choices to protect her loved ones.


The Exchange: After The Firm by John Grisham

In The Exchange by John Grisham, readers are reunited with Mitch and Abby McDeere, the courageous couple who exposed the criminal activities of Memphis law firm Bendini, Lambert & Locke in the previous blockbuster thriller, “The Firm.” Fifteen years have passed, and the McDeeres have relocated to Manhattan, where Mitch has risen to the rank of a partner at the world’s largest law firm. However, their peaceful life is upended when a mentor in Rome calls upon Mitch for a favor that propels him into a web of intrigue with global repercussions. As he becomes entangled in a sinister plot that threatens not only his own life but also the safety of his colleagues, friends, and family, Mitch must once again rely on his wits and cunning to outsmart his adversaries. In this high-stakes sequel, Grisham keeps readers on the edge of their seats as Mitch McDeere faces an adversary with nowhere to hide, showcasing his unparalleled talent for crafting gripping legal thrillers.


What We Kept to Ourselves by Nancy Jooyoun Kim

In What We Kept to Ourselves by Nancy Jooyoun Kim, a family’s secrets and the enduring consequences of their choices unfold across two timelines. In 1999, the Kim family grapples with the mysterious disappearance of Sunny, their mother, leading to an unexpected discovery in their backyard—a stranger’s lifeless body clutching a letter addressed to Sunny, unleashing a cascade of questions about the stranger’s connection to their mother. Meanwhile, in 1977, we follow Sunny, pregnant and disillusioned in Los Angeles, as she yearns for the American dream she had envisioned, her isolation punctuated by a fateful encounter at a bus stop. This powerful and suspenseful narrative explores the family’s profound secrets and the intergenerational silence that shapes their lives, all while meditating on themes of identity, migration, and the enduring pursuit of dreams in the American landscape, offering both a captivating page-turner and a poignant family saga.

Book Review | The Death of Us by Lori Rader-Day

From the publisher: The discovery of a submerged car in a murky pond reveals betrayals and family secrets that will tear a small town apart.

The Death of Us has a great premise. A man cheats on his young wife, and the woman he slept with has a baby. One night, his wife answers the door, and the other woman hands the wife the baby and promptly disappears. Although fifteen years pass for the characters, the mystery of her disappearance is solved quickly in the book. A submerged car is found in an old flooded quarry on the family property. Inside is a baby carrier and some bones.

The husband and wife are now separated, as his ability to stay faithful hasn’t improved. They’ve been raising the child that was left behind together. Liss, the wife, loves her stepson fiercely. Because of the unknown status of his birth mother, Liss has never formally adopted Callan, but she IS his mother. Her husband Link is a man-child, spoiled by his mother, but Liss has broken things off with a man who loves her to try to salvage her damaged marriage.

The Death of Us is a great, fast read. The character development is good – I liked and sympathized with Liss and felt sorry for the teenager who is not quite sure how to handle his emotions when his missing mother is discovered. The marshal investigating the discovery is Liss’s recent lover; the man he replaced is the husband Link’s father. It’s a small town where everyone knows everyone’s business.

I guessed one of the big bads early on, but that did not affect my enjoyment of the book. The author still had to spin out her plot, and I liked watching it unravel. There’s a bit of Hollywood blockbuster nonsense at the end, but the author paints some great pictures. Surprisingly, this is my first book by Rader-Day, but it won’t be my last.

I read an advance reader copy of The Death of Us. It is scheduled to be published on October 3, and the Galesburg Public Library will own the book in print, as an ebook, and in audio. The library owns Rader-Day’s previous six books, if you want to try one now. 

Book Review | A Light in the Dark: Surviving More Than Ted Bundy by Kathy Kleiner Rubin and Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi

From the publisher: The first book by a confirmed survivor of Ted Bundy, and the only memoir to challenge the popular narrative of Bundy as a handsome killer who charmed his victims into trusting him.

I haven’t read that much true crime. I’ve read a lot about John Wayne Gacy because I was in high school in the Chicago area when his horrors were discovered, but I didn’t know much about Ted Bundy going into this memoir. I held the popular beliefs that he was charming and intelligent in addition to being a serial killer. Kathy Kleiner Rubin was one of the young women he attacked when she was sleeping in her sorority bedroom, and she has a lot to say about how Bundy is viewed in popular culture.

The author makes the case that what we believe about Bundy is wrong. He was not charming; most women he approached found him creepy. Most of his victims were not lured into his car by a sad tale that he spun but were attacked in their beds or from behind by Bundy. He was not intelligent or learned; he was a poor student who had no aptitude for the law or anything except killing.

I had no idea how many suspected victims Bundy had. I knew he was brutal but didn’t know his preferred technique was to bash his victims in the head first, before violating them. The author is only a few years older than me, and I found her passionate defense of Bundy’s victims very moving. The memoir very much gave me “there but for the grace of god go I” vibes.

Kathy Kleiner Rubin is very resilient and a true survivor. She has one son, Michael, and he didn’t find out until he was 37 years old that the attack she suffered in college was at the hands of the notorious Ted Bundy. When he found out, he called her in shock. Toward the end of her book, she writes, “Michael was a big part of my happiness in life. During that phone call, as he kept repeating ‘you were so normal’ he brought up the pool parties I hosted for his birthday and other things I did to make his life as ordinary as possible. To me, this was one of my great accomplishments in life. Bundy was on a sick and twisted journey and he dragged his victims down the path. After I survived the attack, I dug in my heels so that he could pull me no further.”

There is some information about the author and her husband surviving Katrina which felt like filler, but aside from that the narrative flowed. The author has a lot of encouraging words for others who are fighting battles. Her words and memories are very inspirational. Appendix A is a list of the women and girls who lost their lives to Bundy, which is very reverential and which I read with great care. As the author points out, none of them are to blame for being murdered by a monster. Appendix C has a helpful list of ways to replace his narrative with remembrances of his victims.

If you like memoirs of people who have overcome great obstacles, or if you’d like to know more about Ted Bundy’s victims, I recommend A Light in the Dark.

I read an advance reader copy of A Light in the Dark. It is scheduled to be published on October 3, and the Galesburg Public Library will own it.

New DVDs — September 2023

The chilly season is upon us, as it’s now officially fall. Grab one of these new DVDs, a good blanket, and your binging buddy to watch the latest flicks!

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

The Little Mermaid

The youngest of King Triton’s daughters, Ariel is a beautiful and spirited young mermaid with a thirst for adventure. Longing to find out more about the world beyond the sea, Ariel visits the surface and falls for the dashing Prince Eric. Following her heart, she makes a deal with the evil sea witch, Ursula, to experience life on land.

Director: Rob Marshall | Starring: Halle Bailey, Jonah Hauer-King, Melissa McCarthy, Javier Bardem | Runtime: 2 hr 15 min

The Collective

Director: Tom DeNucci | Starring: Ruby Rose, Lucas Till, Don Johnson | Runtime: 1 hr 26 min

Prisoner’s Daughter

Director: Catherine Hardwicke | Starring: Sarah Anderson, Maynard Bagang, Kate Beckinsale | Runtime: 1 hr 40 min

Past Lives

In Korea, Na Young, a girl and Hae Sung, a boy are school mates and good friends. They often walk back home together after school. Na Young moves to Canada and then to New York with her parents. Hae Sung continues living in Korea, does his engineering course, goes through a short spell of military service and then takes up a job. Both keep in touch periodically through video chats where they talk of their past and general stuff. Meanwhile in New York, Na has changed her name to Nora, made a name as a playwright and is happily married to Arthur, an American. Hae is keen to meet Nora and visits her in New York where he spends some time with her and Arthur. What has the future in store for Nora and Hae in their relationship?

Director: Celine Song | Starring: Greta Lee, Teo Yoo, John Magaro, Moon Seung-ah Runtime: 1 hr 45 min

Biosphere

Director: Mel Eslyn | Starring: Sterling K. Brown, Mark Duplass | Runtime: 1 hr 46 min

George & Tammy

The limited-series chronicles the country music power couple, Tammy Wynette and George Jones, whose complicated (but enduring) relationship inspired some of the most iconic music of all time. Remembered as the “First Lady of Country Music,” Wynette’s most successful song “Stand by Your Man” remains one of the most iconic and best-selling country singles by a female artist. George Jones’ song “He Stopped Loving Her Today,” is still widely called the greatest country song of all time. With over 30 number-one country songs between them, including duets “We’re Gonna Hold On,” “Golden Ring” and “Near You,” George and Tammy’s legacy, both musically and romantically, remains one of the greatest love stories ever told.

Creator: Abe Sylvia | Starring: Jessica Chastain, Michael Shannon, Steve Zahn, David Wilson Barnes | Episodes: 6

 

Copyright © 2024 Galesburg Public Library. All rights reserved. Web Hosting and Design by InMotion Hosting